Our Skin and Our Health

Our food choices provide our bodies with the nutrients needed to remain healthy. Choosing fruits and vegetables over processed foods help support major organs including the heart and liver. But we often don’t associate the health of our skin with our diet. Our skin is the largest organ in our body. Beyond supporting our cosmetic appearance, our skin is the first line of defense against exposure to bacteria and viruses. When we treat our skin kindly, we optimize our overall health. Eating a balanced diet will help support skin health. Nutrients that are beneficial for skin include beta carotene, vitamins C and E, zinc and selenium.

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We can also support our skin health by eating a minimum of five servings of fruit and vegetables every day. Fruit and vegetables contain antioxidants that work to help protect skin from cellular damage caused by free radicals. Ensuring our diet includes vitamin E also helps skin cell integrity. Vitamin E works to protect skin cells from oxidative or cellular damage and supports healthy skin cell growth.

Staying hydrated is also important to helping support healthy skin. While drinking water isn’t enough to offset dry skin, adequate amounts of water ensure that all cells within our body are able to function at their peak. Our diet should also include healthy fats. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats provide essential fatty acids help maintain our skin’s natural elasticity. Finally include zinc. Zinc is a mineral that helps support the sebaceous glands in the skin. These glands produce the natural oils that our skin needs to repair skin damage.

 Click here for a list of the top foods to support your skin health https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/12-foods-for-healthy-skin#section1

Pilates for MS

Pilates is a mindful practice. Asking you to connect with your bodies.

The pelvic bowl is a ‘gem’ in the pre Pilates repetoire. We use it in every class therapeutic to athletic.

Pelvic Bowl

Purpose: Pelvis mobility

Starting Position:  Lying on your back with your legs bent and arms at your side. Or sitting on a chair with a pillow behind your back.

Movement Description: To begin find your neutral pelvis and imagine a marble resting on your belly button.   Roll the marble towards your ribs by curling your hips to your ribs and flattening your lower back.  Roll the marble to your right hip letting your left hip lift off the ground slightly.   Proceed to roll the marble to your tailbone letting your lower back arch off the mat.  

b) Bring the marble back to your belly button and roll it to your right hip then back to center. Then to your left hip and back to center.

c) Roll the marble to your right hip, then to your ribcage, to your left hip and to the public bone.  Then back to the right hip and repeat.  Change directions and go the other way.

What to watch for:

ü  Keep your shoulders still

ü  Keep your legs easy and try to make this movement happen with the muscles of your torso.

 

Swan on the Wunda Chair

We #love the #pilateswundachair.

#Swanonchair and its preps. I love the feeling of these preparations to get my #shoulderblades to #retract and #integrate with my torso.  My legs stay #active and I feel my entire #deeplongitinualline working to bring me into extension. There is a small base of support so my support muscles have to work hard.

What is the Wunda Chair?

Though the basic design is simple, the Wunda Chair differs from its cousin the reformer in both its size and the support it gives.  Because the base of support on the Chair is so much smaller than the reformer, it requires a great sense of integration throughout your entire body.    Exercises are done lying, sitting, and standing on the chair, as well as from positions to the sides of the chair.  One can expect a lot of stability and flexibility work on the chair. It is truly a testament to the ingenuity of the Pilates method to see how many exercises can be done on it.

Want to give the Chair a Try?  $180 + hst for 3 Privates session in the month of May using the Wunda Chair and other equipment.

Where does Caffeine fit into a healthy diet?

According to StatsCanada after water, coffee is the most frequently consumed beverage by Canadians. With over two thirds of Canadian adults reporting to drink 1 to 4 cups per day.  Coffee is often centred out for containing caffeine, but caffeine is present in a wide variety of products including tea, energy drinks, soft drinks, food and medications. Caffeine provides no nutritional value on its own and it is tasteless making it easy to hide in other foods and drinks.

 

Caffeine causes vasoconstriction or narrowing of small arteries. This arterial constriction occurs throughout the body, however when it occurs within the brain it reduces the activity of your adenosine receptors. Adenosine is a hormone in the body that is responsible for slowing down brain activity and creating the sensation of sleepiness in the body. Because of caffeine’s impact on your adenosine receptors, when caffeine reaches your brain you begin to feel more alert. The impact of caffeine varies from person to person. The longer and more caffeine consumed, the greater the tolerance your body develops overtime. This results in a dependence on regular consumption of caffeine and withdrawal symptoms when you don’t receive that regular dose.

 

It isn’t all bad news though, regular consumption of caffeine has been shown to have positive impacts. Studies have shown that daily consumption of caffeine may reduce rates of Alzheimer’s and dementia as well as potentially offsetting type 2 diabetes. The maximum recommend dose of caffeine is 400 milligrams daily, which is about 2 cups of coffee per day depending on the size of the cup. If you love your morning cup of coffee or tea, enjoy it but be sure watch those serving sizes.

For additional impacts of caffeine on your body, click here - https://www.healthline.com/health/caffeine-effects-on-body#1

Denise Boyd, BSc, Registered Holistic Nutritionist (RNH) with a specialization in Cognitive and Immune Support.

 

 

 

 

Forward Step Up

We Love the #pilateswundachair

Oh the #forwardstepup, this one feel so #good on the legs.  The springs give you assistance but #itisstillhard.   Try to keep both hips level and sink into the front leg hip. As well keep the front knee cap centered over the 2nd toe for #goodlegalignment

What is the Wunda Chair?

Though the basic design is simple, the Wunda Chair differs from its cousin the reformer in both its size and the support it gives.  Because the base of support on the Chair is so much smaller than the reformer, it requires a great sense of integration throughout your entire body.    Exercises are done lying, sitting, and standing on the chair, as well as from positions to the sides of the chair.  One can expect a lot of stability and flexibility work on the chair. It is truly a testament to the ingenuity of the Pilates method to see how many exercises can be done on the Pilates chair.

Want to give the Chair a Try?  $180 + hst for 3 Privates session in the month of May using the Wunda Chair and other equipment.